Zombie survival author to speak at Iowa State

Max Brooks, author of bestselling books “The Zombie Survival Guide” and “World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War,” will speak at Iowa State on Friday about survival tips for a zombie disaster. – See more at: http://amestrib.com/news/zombie-survival-author-speak-iowa-state#sthash.SHJ2rNAH.dpuf
Max Brooks, author of bestselling books “The Zombie Survival Guide” and “World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War,” will speak at Iowa State on Friday about survival tips for a zombie disaster

While the concept of zombie apocalypse may seem like a fictional pop culture idea to some, Max Brooks thinks there are valid discussion points society can learn from the monster phenomenon.

While the concept of zombie apocalypse may seem like a fictional pop culture idea to some, Max Brooks thinks there are valid discussion points society can learn from the monster phenomenon.

Brooks, the New York Times bestselling author of books “The Zombie Survival Guide” and “World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War,” will speak at Iowa State on Friday about survival tips that could actually be applied to real-world disasters.

“I realized that what scared me so much about zombies was that I could be killed without even having seen a zombie,” Brooks said. “What’s so scary about zombies is they chew through the thread that holds society together.”

Although Brooks was born into a world of comedy, being the son of comedy filmmaker Mel Brooks and actress Anne Bancroft, he eventually found something in the zombie culture that he now takes very seriously.

Brooks began writing for “Saturday Night Live” in the early 2000s, but said he was “miscast” for the show and quickly learned that his writing style was different than his father’s.

“There’s a very specific type of writer who is a creature of the writer’s room, who is very collaborative,” Brooks said. “That’s not how I write. That’s how my father writes. My dad would’ve been better in the ‘SNL’ room, I’m much more of a solitary guy.”

Brooks went on to write “The Zombie Survival Guide,” which he said he quickly realized was actually a disaster preparedness manual, but with a fictional disaster. Brooks said people in his zombie scenario would often die of dehydration or starvation, and solutions would be similar in events like a flood or earthquake. Brooks said that reason is also why the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed an anti-zombie protection plan.

Following the survival guide, Brooks went on to write “World War Z,” which included fictional individual accounts of a zombie plague pandemic. An audiobook version was released in 2007, and featured the voices of actors like Mark Hamill and John Turturro, and a more recent film version was released in 2013 and featured Brad Pitt in the lead role. But Brooks, who had no part in the movie’s creation, said the movie that was released ended up being entirely separate from his original book.

“When I actually saw the movie, I ended up seeing a very enjoyable, fun Hollywood blockbuster that just happened to have the same title as the book I once wrote,” he said.

Even while his book inspired a summer blockbuster, Brooks said he’s not sure how important he is to the popularity of zombies right now, and that “time is the ultimate judge.” In the meantime, he’s busy getting ready for the release of his latest graphic novel, “The Harlem Hellfighters,” which is about a real-life unit of African-American soldiers in World War I, who eventually became one of the most successful units in the war.

While he hopes his lecture on Friday will be entertaining, he also wants audience members to come away with good tips for any kind of disaster. He particularly hopes the audience will come ready for a good Q&A session, which he said is his favorite part and keeps him thinking.

“What I’ve always stressed is to get away from what you see in the movies and what you see on television. The point of that is to entertain, and the things that may save your life might not make it in, because that may cost you ratings points. What I’m trying to get away from is the alpha male, machismo, gun-toting survivalist because those guys will be dead in a week,” he said. “I hope people have a good time while the talk is actually going on but I hope on the ride home, it can stimulate a discussion about real disaster preparedness.”

“10 Lessons for Surviving a Zombie Attack”

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While the concept of zombie apocalypse may seem like a fictional pop culture idea to some, Max Brooks thinks there are valid discussion points society can learn from the monster phenomenon.

Brooks, the New York Times bestselling author of books “The Zombie Survival Guide” and “World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War,” will speak at Iowa State on Friday about survival tips that could actually be applied to real-world disasters.

“I realized that what scared me so much about zombies was that I could be killed without even having seen a zombie,” Brooks said. “What’s so scary about zombies is they chew through the thread that holds society together.”

Although Brooks was born into a world of comedy, being the son of comedy filmmaker Mel Brooks and actress Anne Bancroft, he eventually found something in the zombie culture that he now takes very seriously.

Brooks began writing for “Saturday Night Live” in the early 2000s, but said he was “miscast” for the show and quickly learned that his writing style was different than his father’s.

“There’s a very specific type of writer who is a creature of the writer’s room, who is very collaborative,” Brooks said. “That’s not how I write. That’s how my father writes. My dad would’ve been better in the ‘SNL’ room, I’m much more of a solitary guy.”

Brooks went on to write “The Zombie Survival Guide,” which he said he quickly realized was actually a disaster preparedness manual, but with a fictional disaster. Brooks said people in his zombie scenario would often die of dehydration or starvation, and solutions would be similar in events like a flood or earthquake. Brooks said that reason is also why the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed an anti-zombie protection plan.

Following the survival guide, Brooks went on to write “World War Z,” which included fictional individual accounts of a zombie plague pandemic. An audiobook version was released in 2007, and featured the voices of actors like Mark Hamill and John Turturro, and a more recent film version was released in 2013 and featured Brad Pitt in the lead role. But Brooks, who had no part in the movie’s creation, said the movie that was released ended up being entirely separate from his original book.

“When I actually saw the movie, I ended up seeing a very enjoyable, fun Hollywood blockbuster that just happened to have the same title as the book I once wrote,” he said.

Even while his book inspired a summer blockbuster, Brooks said he’s not sure how important he is to the popularity of zombies right now, and that “time is the ultimate judge.” In the meantime, he’s busy getting ready for the release of his latest graphic novel, “The Harlem Hellfighters,” which is about a real-life unit of African-American soldiers in World War I, who eventually became one of the most successful units in the war.

While he hopes his lecture on Friday will be entertaining, he also wants audience members to come away with good tips for any kind of disaster. He particularly hopes the audience will come ready for a good Q&A session, which he said is his favorite part and keeps him thinking.

“What I’ve always stressed is to get away from what you see in the movies and what you see on television. The point of that is to entertain, and the things that may save your life might not make it in, because that may cost you ratings points. What I’m trying to get away from is the alpha male, machismo, gun-toting survivalist because those guys will be dead in a week,” he said. “I hope people have a good time while the talk is actually going on but I hope on the ride home, it can stimulate a discussion about real disaster preparedness.”

“10 Lessons for Surviving a Zombie Attack”

Where: Iowa State Memorial Union, Great Hall

– See more at: http://amestrib.com/news/zombie-survival-author-speak-iowa-state#sthash.SHJ2rNAH.dpuf

While the concept of zombie apocalypse may seem like a fictional pop culture idea to some, Max Brooks thinks there are valid discussion points society can learn from the monster phenomenon.

Brooks, the New York Times bestselling author of books “The Zombie Survival Guide” and “World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War,” will speak at Iowa State on Friday about survival tips that could actually be applied to real-world disasters.

“I realized that what scared me so much about zombies was that I could be killed without even having seen a zombie,” Brooks said. “What’s so scary about zombies is they chew through the thread that holds society together.”

Although Brooks was born into a world of comedy, being the son of comedy filmmaker Mel Brooks and actress Anne Bancroft, he eventually found something in the zombie culture that he now takes very seriously.

Brooks began writing for “Saturday Night Live” in the early 2000s, but said he was “miscast” for the show and quickly learned that his writing style was different than his father’s.

“There’s a very specific type of writer who is a creature of the writer’s room, who is very collaborative,” Brooks said. “That’s not how I write. That’s how my father writes. My dad would’ve been better in the ‘SNL’ room, I’m much more of a solitary guy.”

Brooks went on to write “The Zombie Survival Guide,” which he said he quickly realized was actually a disaster preparedness manual, but with a fictional disaster. Brooks said people in his zombie scenario would often die of dehydration or starvation, and solutions would be similar in events like a flood or earthquake. Brooks said that reason is also why the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed an anti-zombie protection plan.

Following the survival guide, Brooks went on to write “World War Z,” which included fictional individual accounts of a zombie plague pandemic. An audiobook version was released in 2007, and featured the voices of actors like Mark Hamill and John Turturro, and a more recent film version was released in 2013 and featured Brad Pitt in the lead role. But Brooks, who had no part in the movie’s creation, said the movie that was released ended up being entirely separate from his original book.

“When I actually saw the movie, I ended up seeing a very enjoyable, fun Hollywood blockbuster that just happened to have the same title as the book I once wrote,” he said.

Even while his book inspired a summer blockbuster, Brooks said he’s not sure how important he is to the popularity of zombies right now, and that “time is the ultimate judge.” In the meantime, he’s busy getting ready for the release of his latest graphic novel, “The Harlem Hellfighters,” which is about a real-life unit of African-American soldiers in World War I, who eventually became one of the most successful units in the war.

While he hopes his lecture on Friday will be entertaining, he also wants audience members to come away with good tips for any kind of disaster. He particularly hopes the audience will come ready for a good Q&A session, which he said is his favorite part and keeps him thinking.

“What I’ve always stressed is to get away from what you see in the movies and what you see on television. The point of that is to entertain, and the things that may save your life might not make it in, because that may cost you ratings points. What I’m trying to get away from is the alpha male, machismo, gun-toting survivalist because those guys will be dead in a week,” he said. “I hope people have a good time while the talk is actually going on but I hope on the ride home, it can stimulate a discussion about real disaster preparedness.”

“10 Lessons for Surviving a Zombie Attack”

– See more at: http://amestrib.com/news/zombie-survival-author-speak-iowa-state#sthash.SHJ2rNAH.dpuf

While the concept of zombie apocalypse may seem like a fictional pop culture idea to some, Max Brooks thinks there are valid discussion points society can learn from the monster phenomenon.

Brooks, the New York Times bestselling author of books “The Zombie Survival Guide” and “World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War,” will speak at Iowa State on Friday about survival tips that could actually be applied to real-world disasters.

“I realized that what scared me so much about zombies was that I could be killed without even having seen a zombie,” Brooks said. “What’s so scary about zombies is they chew through the thread that holds society together.”

Although Brooks was born into a world of comedy, being the son of comedy filmmaker Mel Brooks and actress Anne Bancroft, he eventually found something in the zombie culture that he now takes very seriously.

Brooks began writing for “Saturday Night Live” in the early 2000s, but said he was “miscast” for the show and quickly learned that his writing style was different than his father’s.

“There’s a very specific type of writer who is a creature of the writer’s room, who is very collaborative,” Brooks said. “That’s not how I write. That’s how my father writes. My dad would’ve been better in the ‘SNL’ room, I’m much more of a solitary guy.”

Brooks went on to write “The Zombie Survival Guide,” which he said he quickly realized was actually a disaster preparedness manual, but with a fictional disaster. Brooks said people in his zombie scenario would often die of dehydration or starvation, and solutions would be similar in events like a flood or earthquake. Brooks said that reason is also why the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed an anti-zombie protection plan.

Following the survival guide, Brooks went on to write “World War Z,” which included fictional individual accounts of a zombie plague pandemic. An audiobook version was released in 2007, and featured the voices of actors like Mark Hamill and John Turturro, and a more recent film version was released in 2013 and featured Brad Pitt in the lead role. But Brooks, who had no part in the movie’s creation, said the movie that was released ended up being entirely separate from his original book.

“When I actually saw the movie, I ended up seeing a very enjoyable, fun Hollywood blockbuster that just happened to have the same title as the book I once wrote,” he said.

Even while his book inspired a summer blockbuster, Brooks said he’s not sure how important he is to the popularity of zombies right now, and that “time is the ultimate judge.” In the meantime, he’s busy getting ready for the release of his latest graphic novel, “The Harlem Hellfighters,” which is about a real-life unit of African-American soldiers in World War I, who eventually became one of the most successful units in the war.

While he hopes his lecture on Friday will be entertaining, he also wants audience members to come away with good tips for any kind of disaster. He particularly hopes the audience will come ready for a good Q&A session, which he said is his favorite part and keeps him thinking.

“What I’ve always stressed is to get away from what you see in the movies and what you see on television. The point of that is to entertain, and the things that may save your life might not make it in, because that may cost you ratings points. What I’m trying to get away from is the alpha male, machismo, gun-toting survivalist because those guys will be dead in a week,” he said. “I hope people have a good time while the talk is actually going on but I hope on the ride home, it can stimulate a discussion about real disaster preparedness.”

“10 Lessons for Surviving a Zombie Attack”

– See more at: http://amestrib.com/news/zombie-survival-author-speak-iowa-state#sthash.SHJ2rNAH.dpuf

While the concept of zombie apocalypse may seem like a fictional pop culture idea to some, Max Brooks thinks there are valid discussion points society can learn from the monster phenomenon.

Brooks, the New York Times bestselling author of books “The Zombie Survival Guide” and “World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War,” will speak at Iowa State on Friday about survival tips that could actually be applied to real-world disasters.

“I realized that what scared me so much about zombies was that I could be killed without even having seen a zombie,” Brooks said. “What’s so scary about zombies is they chew through the thread that holds society together.”

Although Brooks was born into a world of comedy, being the son of comedy filmmaker Mel Brooks and actress Anne Bancroft, he eventually found something in the zombie culture that he now takes very seriously.

Brooks began writing for “Saturday Night Live” in the early 2000s, but said he was “miscast” for the show and quickly learned that his writing style was different than his father’s.

“There’s a very specific type of writer who is a creature of the writer’s room, who is very collaborative,” Brooks said. “That’s not how I write. That’s how my father writes. My dad would’ve been better in the ‘SNL’ room, I’m much more of a solitary guy.”

Brooks went on to write “The Zombie Survival Guide,” which he said he quickly realized was actually a disaster preparedness manual, but with a fictional disaster. Brooks said people in his zombie scenario would often die of dehydration or starvation, and solutions would be similar in events like a flood or earthquake. Brooks said that reason is also why the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed an anti-zombie protection plan.

Following the survival guide, Brooks went on to write “World War Z,” which included fictional individual accounts of a zombie plague pandemic. An audiobook version was released in 2007, and featured the voices of actors like Mark Hamill and John Turturro, and a more recent film version was released in 2013 and featured Brad Pitt in the lead role. But Brooks, who had no part in the movie’s creation, said the movie that was released ended up being entirely separate from his original book.

“When I actually saw the movie, I ended up seeing a very enjoyable, fun Hollywood blockbuster that just happened to have the same title as the book I once wrote,” he said.

Even while his book inspired a summer blockbuster, Brooks said he’s not sure how important he is to the popularity of zombies right now, and that “time is the ultimate judge.” In the meantime, he’s busy getting ready for the release of his latest graphic novel, “The Harlem Hellfighters,” which is about a real-life unit of African-American soldiers in World War I, who eventually became one of the most successful units in the war.

While he hopes his lecture on Friday will be entertaining, he also wants audience members to come away with good tips for any kind of disaster. He particularly hopes the audience will come ready for a good Q&A session, which he said is his favorite part and keeps him thinking.

“What I’ve always stressed is to get away from what you see in the movies and what you see on television. The point of that is to entertain, and the things that may save your life might not make it in, because that may cost you ratings points. What I’m trying to get away from is the alpha male, machismo, gun-toting survivalist because those guys will be dead in a week,” he said. “I hope people have a good time while the talk is actually going on but I hope on the ride home, it can stimulate a discussion about real disaster preparedness.”

“10 Lessons for Surviving a Zombie Attack”

– See more at: http://amestrib.com/news/zombie-survival-author-speak-iowa-state#sthash.SHJ2rNAH.dpuf

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